DNS server has changed


#1

Glasswire very recently started using Cloudflare(1.1.1.1 or 1.0.0.1 or 1.x.x.x). Use to be 208.67.222.220 and x.x.x.222 which are OpenDNS servers. Why the change? Also, I go and change the adapter setting to a different DNS and it retains it only for a specific amount of time before reverting to the Cloudflare servers.


#2

@inesbeag

GlassWire does not make any changes to your DNS server settings, however it can tell you if your DNS server settings have been changed by something else.


#3

How are the adapter settings being changed in the adapter IPv4 properties?

  1. The DNS setting is being changed to “Obtain DNS server address automatically”; or

  2. The “Preferred DNS server” and the “Alternate DNS server” addresses are being changed

I expect another program is making the changes. Many security/anti-virus products will do this.


#4

This happens to me a lot depending on what VPN application I use, and what the settings are. The OP may try a DNS leak test just to be sure no sketchy things are going on.


#5

A DNS leak only occurs when you are trying to hide your ISP host with, for example, a VPN. But @inesbeag hasn’t mentioned a VPN. He/she has only described trying to use OpenDNS’s public DNS servers, which setting is being changed to Cloudflare’s public DNS servers.

So are you suggesting that @inesbeag run the DNS leak test to confirm that the hostname is actually one that is owned by his/her ISP, as expected if there is no VPN involved.


#6

I realize what is involved with a DNS leak, those are just things I would try as they never specified anything about using a VPN. I was just kind of assuming that’s common practice these days.


#7

I know you know what is involved - sorry but I’m just in the habit of making posts understandable by users who don’t. :blush:

FYI, VPN users in the West (North America, Europe, Oceania) are less than 1 in 10. But you’re probably in one of the demographic groups that do use VPN heavily: users wanting improved privacy and security; users sidestepping geo-blocking; hackers; etc.

VPN use is more than twice as high - up to 1 in 4 in Asia. the Middle East and Latin America - where people are more limited by geo-blocking and where political regimes are more intrusive.


#8

Didn’t know that, all of my friends are like minded so they take most of the security precautions I take and layer security.

I honestly would have thought the US had more VPN usage, especially with our Government and the info released by Snowden, ect… Personally I work for them so I make sure to lock down my systems as I know what they monitor lol plus you can never be to safe when securing your systems.


#9

We’ve got off topic but here’s more stats in explanation. I note that US users are not very motivated to use VPNs. Despite concerns about state-sponsored surveillance in the US, the potential consequences of surveillance are far less life-threatening than in many other countries. There also less motivation to break geo-blocks and geo-locks because the US is where most of the content comes from anyway.

The statistics vary between sources because there are timing and classification/definition issues, I was using stats from a website for “uses VPN at least once a week on desktop” which was the context for the OP’s topic. If I instead choose “uses VPN at least once a month on any platform” (see the link below) I can get a much higher US figure of 17%. But if desktop VPN use is only 2/3 (17/25) of the total then the comparison with my figures drops to 11-12% which is about 1 in 9 - not much different from what I said.

Reported in March 2018 - accessed a VPN in the last month on any device type

  • Worldwide: 25%
  • Asia Pacific: 30%
  • Latin America: 23%
  • Middle East & Africa: 19%
  • Europe: 17%
  • North America: 17%

By device type:

  • Desktop – 17%
  • Mobile – 15%
  • Tablet – 7%

P.S. I should have added that younger adults are much more likely to use VPNs so the younger you are then the higher the VPN usage among your peers.


#10

Very interesting!

I am in the US, and I don’t use a VPN on my own safe network because I find it slows down the network too much in many cases.

I do use a VPN for business reasons or when using WiFi, or on other unknown networks.


#11

Shouldn’t that kind of alert provide more information? Currently is kinda useless, isn’t it?
They previous and new IP address/list of addresses would be nice.


#12

Personally I find a notification stating my DNS changed is more than enough information. How would you find a notification you weren’t recieving previously useless?


#13

You can display the alerts in “Type” order and find the DNS type and see the previous setting. The information is there, it’s just not shown in one alert.